Publications

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A Huge Peritoneal Inclusion Cyst Mimicking Peritoneal Tuberculosis: A Case Report

Simeon MaraDepartment of Internal Medicine, College of medicine and health sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia
, Yegzeru BeleteSchool of Medicine , College of medicine and health sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia
ybtmeat.1@gmail.com
, Abebaw AmareDepartment of Pathology, College of medicine and health sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia.
, Tinsae AmsaluKibru primary Hospital, Hawassa, Ethiopia
, Kifle AlamirewKibru primary Hospital, Hawassa, Ethiopia
, Eyasu EliasDepartment of General Surgery, Adare General Hospital, Hawassa, Ethiopia

SUBMITTED: 19.05.2024 PEER REVIEWED IN: India, Zambia ACCEPTED: 17.06.2024 PUBLISHED: 19.06.2024
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Peritoneal inclusion cysts are uncommon abdominopelvic cysts seen in middle aged women who have abdominopelvic surgery or inflammatory disease of the pelvis. Here, we present a case of a 35 -year-old male patient with a huge peritoneal inclusion cyst which mimicked and treated as tuberculosis for two and half months after he presented with progressive abdominal distention of 2-month duration with dull aching abdominal pain and early satiety. Later, diagnosis was made and treated with cyst excision by laparotomy and has no recurrence at nine months of follow up. A Peritoneal inclusion cyst can occur in a middle-aged male with no history of abdominal surgery or trauma. Peritoneal inclusion cysts are worthy to note in the differential diagnosis of abdominal mass and ascites.

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Built To Last: A Scoping Review Of Surgical Capacity Building Approaches In Conflict-affected Settings

Kayla Pfeiffer-Mundt
, Sofia Wagemaker
, Alaa Ismail
, Lynette Dominguez
, Adam L Kushner
, Christopher Hooper Lane
, Kristin Long
longk@surgery.wisc.edu

SUBMITTED: 01.03.2024 PEER REVIEWED IN: United Kingdom, Singapore, United States ACCEPTED: 22.03.2024 PUBLISHED: 22.03.2024
A PEER REVIEWER FOR THIS ARTICLE DONATED THEIR $10 BITCOIN CASH STIPEND TO Children's Surgical Centre, Cambodia!
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Background: Access to safe surgery is a critical need in settings affected by armed conflict. Humanitarian organizations can temporarily fill gaps in facilities, supplies, and trained providers. However, it is critically important to build sustainable national surgical capacity as nations emerge from conflict and reconstruct society. We conducted a scoping review to synthesize the evidence on surgical capacity-building in conflict-affected settings with the goal of identifying gaps in the literature to better enable future international humanitarian organizations to support national partners in building capacity and promoting access to care. Materials and Methods: A systematic search of PubMed and Scopus was conducted, along with a review of grey literature published by surgical non-governmental organizations using keywords related to surgery, humanitarian work, and conflict settings. Results and Discussion: The literature search identified articles describing projects in general surgery, trauma, obstetrics and gynecology, cardiothoracic, vascular, ophthalmology, and reconstructive surgery across 32 countries. Capacity-building interventions identified included: one-off training sessions, on-the-job training, task-shifting, long-term skill-building projects, dedicated postgraduate training programs, and infrastructure support. Conclusions: Understanding which interventions are most effective for building long-term surgical capacity in conflict settings will require better data collection, evaluation, and sharing. The current literature does not reflect the full scope of work being conducted in the field. Organizations should ensure alignment with local needs via surgical needs assessments. Reporting on outcomes of capacity-building work was extremely limited, impeding future efforts to build surgical capacity in conflict-affected regions.

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Empowering The Rural Surgeons, The Way Forward For Meeting The Surgical Needs Of Rural Areas

Gnanaraj Jesudian
jgnanaraj@gmail.com

SUBMITTED: 29.06.2021 PEER REVIEWED IN: United Kingdom, India, Mexico ACCEPTED: 13.08.2021 PUBLISHED: 14.08.2021
A PEER REVIEWER FOR THIS ARTICLE DONATED THEIR $10 BITCOIN CASH STIPEND TO Children's Surgical Centre, Cambodia!
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Globally, 60% of the surgical procedures are carried out for 15% of the world population in developed countries. The Lancet commission on Global surgery estimates that a population of 100000 would ideally require 5000 surgical procedures every year. Although the national average is about 800 in most of the rural areas in India, in the North-eastern states it varies from 30 to 300. We look at the various models and options available for empowering the surgeons in the rural areas. Short Term Medical Missions have been used for a long time including those with structured programs. Pioneering long term medical missions are few and difficult to sustain. Empowering surgeons working in rural areas with modern surgical techniques is a sustainable solution with high impact. Empowering the rural surgeons with training in Gas Insufflation Less Laparoscopic Surgeries and Endoscopic Urology surgeries helped the surgical coverage in the target population of the 8 rural hospitals studied go up from 1287 per 100000 per year to 2880 the next year and 3739 the following year. It is a financially sustainable model that could be scaled up by funding travel of the trainers and equipment for the trainees.

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